No Words for Love and Famine

No Words for Love and Famine by Roberta Morris“Roberta Morris combines complex levels of intellectual wit and contemporary philosophical and literary theory with a warm and moving tory of two flawed and vial people.  The form is brilliant and ambitious and carries the patterning of ideas through with great success – with ease, not anger, pleasure, not effort, a voice playing freely in it own space.  Jean-Philippe starves himself in Montreal while his wife bloats up with pizza, and his best friend in Toronto imply can’t write that eay on famine in Afrida.  Relishing contradictions and laughing at the devil, Morris integrates language in No Words for Love and Famine with energy and sparkling humour.”  Cormorant Books

“Roberta Morris has written an intelligent, engaging postmodern fiction-theory, exploring language, relationships and philosophies like existentialism.  These elements are embodied in very human characters who are in turn despairing and hopeful in their attempts to construct ways to live in the fragmented, de-centered wilds of late 20th century North America.”  Libby Scheier, author

“This engrossing novel records the life struggles of Jean-Philippe and Lois, two writers who undergo much turmoil as they wrestle with dilemmas in their careers and marriages. The first half of the book consists of letters that Jean-Philippe and Lois write to each other. The second half is a dialogue among the main characters. Through their communications, Jean-Philippe and Lois articulately debate various philosophies. Themes explored include the many limitations of language (ironic, particularly considering that the two characters are writers); the hardships presented by hunger (for food as well as for love, identity, and a meaningful life); and the nature of reality (the novel suggests that many realities simultaneously exist, each created by every individual).  Review by Canadian Book Review Annual

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